Trouble on the Tracks

This book is a partner book to Rescue at Poverty Gulch, a Ruby and Maude Adventure set in Cripple Creek in 1896.   Once again, Ruby and Maude come face to face with the notorious, Jake Hawker. A mistaken arrest is made, and Trouble, a cat with an attitude, endears itself to Ruby and Maude. Ruby learns more than she ever wants to know about Pinkertons, outlaws, disguises, and train rides, and her life is held in a balance as Pa reconsiders his courtship of Miss Sternum in order to give Ruby a proper upbringing.

2015 Colorado Author's League and Will Rogers Medallion Finalist ​

Insects in the Infield

Not historical fiction but a fun sibling rivalry book. This book is full of ants, bees, dragonflies, and limping millipedes.  Older brother, Buster, would rather ignore his brainy sister Maggie’s insect zoo, but he needs her help with the carnival fundraiser for his baseball team, the Cougars. Unfortunately, Buster needs more than fundraising help from his sister. His failing math grade is at a full count—one more strike and he won’t be able to play against the three Pirate bullies: Chewy, Ace, and Rip. The town of Ashville may never be the same after these rival teams clash. Bugs and baseball don’t mix.


2014 Cipa Evvy Award Winner

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Nancy Oswald's Books


Through experience and vision, Nancy Oswald creates books that connect readers to the past. She believes in tears, laughter, and truth-telling, and the writing advice of Leonard Elmore:  “Try to leave out the parts that readers tend to skip.”

Rescue in Poverty Gulch

Eleven-year-old Ruby is in a pickle. After years of traveling the mountains and hills of Colorado with her Pa and their donkey, Maude, Pa decides to settle down in the booming gold mining town of Cripple Creek.

Worse than that, Pa decides it’s time for Ruby to learn something about being a lady. Vinegar and baking soda don’t mix.  Ruby faces the prospects of having to wear a corset, learning the art of elocution, and the possibility of having the school headmistress for a mother. Events lead Ruby into the midst of the 1896 Cripple Creek fire and culminate with the kidnapping and rescue of Maude from the clutches of a local scoundrel.


Colorado Book Award Finalist, Spur Finalist, and CIPA Evvy winner.


Nothing Here But Stones

Based on the Cotopaxi Jewish Colony in Colorado, 1882-1884. Eleven year old Emma has left Russia with her family to start a new life in America.  On her train trip west, the farther she travels, the more she begins to wonder about her new life. In her words:

“It’s hard to imagine what things will be like in five more years.  I can’t even imagine ten minutes from now.  At first I thought everything in America would look like New York City, with shops and crowded streets, but I have discovered the farther west we travel, that there are long stretches of nothing.  Absolutely nothing.  Places as flat as matzo.”


Willa Literary Award Winner, Spur Finalist, and Notable Book for a Global Society

Edward Wynkoop

This biography of a prominent figure in Colorado’s History won the prestigious Spur Award from the Western Writers of America in 2015.  Edward Wynkoop helped to found Denver and became a town leader and Denver’s first sheriff.  He fought at Glorieta Pass in the American Civil War, and continued his military career on the American frontier where he befriended Chief Black Kettle of the Cheyenne and became an advocate for the Plains Indians before and after the Sand Creek Massacre—a bloody chapter in Colorado’s history.


2015 Spur Award Winner


Quality Literature for the Young and Young at Heart

Hard Face Moon

Hard Face Moon is set during the events leading up to and beyond the Sand Creek massacre and told through the viewpoint of a mute coming-of-age Cheyenne youth. Thirteen year old, Hides Inside, and the other Cheyenne boys want to realize their dreams of becoming warriors. All is shattered one cold November morning when Colonel John M. Chivington and his "Bloodless Third" ride into the camps of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians near Sandy Creek.

“A very powerful narrative of a chilling event."  Irene Bell, Denver Public Schools Reviewer


Third Place Evvy Winner 2009